Fashion Trends–Tulle Overskirts, Sheer Sleeves, and Yokes

Tulle overskirts are a delightful embellishment for bridal wear and evening wear. This Create It pattern from Butterick features a beautiful layered long tulle skirt, which can be paired with a bodice featuring a sheer yoke. The yoke can be made of soft sheers such as chiffon or georgette.

Sheer long sleeves are a classic style which is making a come back. This Butterick pattern features yokes and sleeves of sheer material such as chiffon or lace.

Sheer and lace yokes, sleeves and overskirts are suitable for all special occasion dresses, not just bridal wear. This is a great look for prom dresses and quinceañera gowns.

Glorious colors add to the appeal of sheer fabrics.

A palette of sheer colors for your creative pleasure.

Sheer fabrics come in an amazing range of shades. You can find virtually any hue imaginable. Sheers can be matched with lovely satins for a delightful monotone look. Choose satin of a slightly different shade than your sheer to achieve a marvelous tone on tone look.

So many choices!

Tulle is available in a glitter variety to add extra glamour to your project. Point d’Esprit Tulle is another option; this delicate fabric features dots to give your fashion a unique look.

Browse through OnlineFabricStore.net’s complete selection of sheer fabrics to see all your choices.

Here are some tips to help your finished sheer fabric project look as lovely as you imagine:

1. Use the correct size sewing machine needle. A #11 or #9 sewing machine needle is best for these delicate fabrics.

2. Remember that sheers do require special handling. If you are a novice sewer, but really want to use sheers in your project, ask a more experienced sewer for help with the sheer part of the garment.

3. Change you sewing machine’s plate to a straight stitch plate to help prevent the sheer fabric from jamming in the feed dogs. If you don’t have access to a straight stitch plate, make the hole in the existing stitch plate smaller by place tape at each end.

4. Always test your machine’s stitch length and bobbin tension on a scrap of the material you will be using. I know from personal experience that this will save you a lot of time and frustration.